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Borage in the kitchen

Borage in the kitchen

Borage in the kitchen: uses, recipes and tips for cooking borage and preparing excellent courses.

From the field to the plate: theborageit's awild plant!It can be grown easily in the vegetable garden but is just as easy to find in fallow fields. If during a walk immersed in nature you have collected someborage, its use in the kitchen will restore excellent dishes and long forgotten flavors.

Borage in the kitchen

Of theborageflowers and leaves are used. The flowers are used in very small quantities to garnish salads or enrich soups. The leaves must be used only after boiling in order to eliminate the superficial hair.

Once boiled, the leaves can be used to fill pizzas, flavor doughs or to make ravioli and tortellini filling.

Borage leaves, always after boiling, can be used fried in batter or chopped to enrich a vegetable omelette.

Borage can enrich stews, soups and stews by adding an almost flavorsour vaguely reminiscent of that of cucumber.

Between recipes more complex to use borage in cooking, we point out the paccheri stuffed with borage and sausage, the Grana Padano and borage risotto, the vegetarian lasagna with borage and cheeses and the tordei, a stuffed pasta typical of Liguria, like tortellini, but more flattened and stuffed traditionally of cheeses and wild herbs.

The use of theborage in the kitchenit is not only tasty but also recommended: theborageit is rich in vitamin C and potassium. It has interesting nutritional properties. Its consumption is recommended for those suffering from high blood pressure and 100 grams of this vegetable provide only 21 kcal. Among the other micronutrients contained in borage we point out calcium, magnesium, vitamin A and iron.

Borage in the kitchen, alternative recipes

As stated, also iborage flowersthey are edible: they can be used to garnish different dishes. Alternatively, you can freeze borage flowers in ice cubes to add a pop of color to your summer drinks.

THE borage flowers they can be used to flavor and color vinegar; how? To flavor the vinegar you will need:

  • 30 borage flowers
  • a fresh garlic seedling
  • a leaf of wild fennel
  • a parsley flower
  • an onion sprout
  • 200 ml of white vinegar

The only caveat is in the choice of garlic! You don't have to take the classic garlic in "cloves" but a young plant that has not yet generated the seeds. Cut the vegetables into small pieces and carefully treat the buds, flowers and leaves. Wash everything with extreme care, place in a jar and cover with white vinegar.

After a few minutes of infusion, you will notice that the flowers ofboragethey will begin to lose their typical purplish-blue color and turn pink, at the same time, the vinegar will tend to acquire color and blend delicately. Leave the leaves, buds and flowers to infuse in the vinegar for a few days. At the end of the wait, you can use the flavored and colored vinegar to dress salads, boiled meats, fish ... the vinegar obtained will have a very delicate aromatic note. The flowers of borage, once removed from the vinegar, they can be used to garnish and enrich salads.

Borage in the kitchen, contraindications

As already explained in the article dedicated to properties of borage, recipes that see the use of this raw wild grass are rare due to its contraindications.

Among its contraindications, the consumption of raw borage sees a possible hepatotoxicity linked to the pyrrolizidine compounds that in some plant phases abound in the plant. With cooking, these compounds lose their activity. The leaves of the plant are covered with a dense hair that is very rough on the palate, which is also why borage must be well cooked. Borage seed oil is pyrrolizidine free.

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Video: Monty Don and the kitchen garden; vegetables, fruit and herbs at Berryfields. Gardeners World 2005. (August 2021).